Home » Posts Tagged "The Brainware Company"

When Brain Training Works – Points of Controversy

Pre-publication publicity for a new book on the value of brain training claims that there are 5 conditions that make it effective. While this discussion surfaces some important considerations, it is likely to disappoint anyone who adheres strictly to the five conditions. Here’s where the advice falls short.

The Mystery of Reading Comprehension

Many students can read a passage, but afterwards are unable to tell you what they read. Or perhaps they can answer simple factual questions (regurgitate), but it really has no meaning for them and will be forgotten the next day.

Neuroscience and the U.S. Education System

Education informed by neuroscience can give new and real meaning to our desire as a nation to leave no child behind.  Moreover, it may offer the only true opportunity for

Brain Training Programs: Neither Silver Bullet nor Scam

A recent article asked the question: Are Brain Training Programs a Scam? Like many articles on the subject these days, the analysis was right in some respects, but missed several

Curing Educational Indigestion – Three Solutions to Overly Full Plates

“Our district is currently doing a lot of work to implement STEM (Common Core, new technology, etc.), and our teachers feel like they are constantly having things added to their

Deal with the Big Rocks First … Prioritizing

Have you ever noticed that some people just drift through life dealing with each problem as it comes along and then wonder where all the time has gone, and why

Closing the Achievement Gaps: The Need for a Cognitive Intervention

The remediation statistics are sobering. Over half of students who enroll in 2-year colleges take remedial courses in English and/or math. Almost 20% of those enrolling in 4-year colleges do

Executive Functions and Reading Comprehension (blog)

There are varied opinions among education and neuroscience researchers regarding how many executive functions are involved in human cognitive processing, but the role that executive functions play in reading comprehension