Home » Posts Tagged "Neuroscience"

How Mirror Neurons Signal Empathy and Moral Decision-Making

Mirror neurons are a type of neuron that is equally active when we are performing an activity or watching someone else perform that activity.  They have been shown to have a role in imitation, in empathy, and most recently their activity has been shown to predict moral choices that involve others.

The Neuroscience of Stress and Learning

In this webinar, Dr. Lou Whitaker, President of Open Minds Enterprises, discusses the neuroscience of stress, the effect of stress on learning and development, and tools and strategies for helping our students and ourselves deal with stress, both acute and chronic.

CIOReview Names BrainWare Learning Company to Top 20 Gamification List

BrainWare Learning Company is named one of the top 20 global gamification solutions providers by CIOReview, a leading online technology magazine, in the publication’s November issue. According to CIOReview, the

Why Teachers Should Study Neuroscience – Dr. Pat Wolfe Webinar

Join award-winning author and presenter, Dr. Pat Wolfe for a “mini-web” session on the application of brain research to instructional practice. If you're ever wondered would neuroscience could do for your teaching, you won't want to miss this!

Two Types of Brain Waves – Two Types of Memory

Neuroscience researchers at MIT have been able to distinguish between brain waves associated with explicit learning and implicit learning. The fact that different types of brain waves are involved underscores the importance of teachers understanding the difference between the two types of memory and the different strategies that will be effective in the two types of learning.

Bullying Causes Long-Term Physical Brain Changes

If you think that bullying is something kids will someday get over, think again.  Research shows that bullying results in physical brain changes and serious long-term cognitive and emotional deficits.

Human Brains Find Hidden Objects that Computers Can’t Find

Do you see the keys in this picture? That's because the human brain is really good at seeing partially obscured objects. New research conducted at the University of Washington in Seattle examined the interactions between the visual cortex and the prefrontal cortex when subjects tried to identify partially hidden objects.

Generosity Brings Cognitive and Emotional Benefits

What Buddha knew about generosity long ago has now been confirmed by neuroscientists who have shown the connection between generosity and structural brain changes in the areas of the brain associated with empathy and social cognition.

Are Male and Female Brains All That Different?

Lon Woodbury, an Ed Consultant (IECA), a Certified Educational Planner (CEP), and an Internet Talk Radio Host focusing on news and personal help for parents of struggling and troubled teens with behavioral/learning problems. interviews Betsy Hill, president of BrainWare Learning Company, on the differences between male and female brains.

Forgetting Can Actually Make Us Smarter

We all worry about forgetting things, but it turns out that forgetting can actually make us smarter and our brains are designed to promote memory loss under certain circumstances!

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