Home » Posts Tagged "Neuroscience"

Brain Games and Brain Training are Different

In the last week, we came across another study that says that neuroscientists have debunked the claims that a brain game results in a brain gain.  No kidding!Research scientists seem to be in love with the idea of contradicting the market hype about the value of brain games.  And that’s a good thing.  There is far too much hype.  And too little understanding of the difference between a brain game and serious cognitive training (also called brain-training). Saying that a typical “brain game” can yield measurable cognitive benefit that translates into real-world improvements is like saying that exercising the biceps of your left arm will lead to overall physical fitness.

Time for Some Summer Webinar Binge Watching?

Summer is a great time to catch up on webinars that you might have missed (and get some professional development credit along the way).  Here are some of our most

The Marshmallow Test Revisited

You may already be familiar with the marshmallow test.  If not, imagine a 4-year old in a room.  The researcher puts a marshmallow on the table in front of the

What Our Brains Think is Funny

April Fools’ Day reminds us to think about the lighter side of life and the age-old question: Why are some things funny?  Now the neuroscientists have gotten into the game

Automaticity – What It Takes and Why It Matters

Automaticity is a concept we talk about in cognitive training — getting skills practiced to the point where they don’t require conscious thought.  The concept also applies in other training

Neuroscience-Based Learning Strategies for Teachers and Students

There’s a lot we can learn from neuroscience about the learning process and how to get learning to stick. Teachers need to understand some basics of neuroscience so that they can help students learn better.  Students also need to learn about their brains so that they will be able to utilize strategies to be more successful, whether it is school-related or not. 

How Mirror Neurons Signal Empathy and Moral Decision-Making

Mirror neurons are a type of neuron that is equally active when we are performing an activity or watching someone else perform that activity.  They have been shown to have a role in imitation, in empathy, and most recently their activity has been shown to predict moral choices that involve others.

The Neuroscience of Stress and Learning

In this webinar, Dr. Lou Whitaker, President of Open Minds Enterprises, discusses the neuroscience of stress, the effect of stress on learning and development, and tools and strategies for helping our students and ourselves deal with stress, both acute and chronic.

CIOReview Names BrainWare Learning Company to Top 20 Gamification List

BrainWare Learning Company is named one of the top 20 global gamification solutions providers by CIOReview, a leading online technology magazine, in the publication’s November issue. According to CIOReview, the

Why Teachers Should Study Neuroscience – Dr. Pat Wolfe Webinar

Join award-winning author and presenter, Dr. Pat Wolfe for a “mini-web” session on the application of brain research to instructional practice. If you're ever wondered would neuroscience could do for your teaching, you won't want to miss this!

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