Home » Posts Tagged "Cognitive Training"

What Do You Mean by “Cognitive Capacity?”

A webinar hosted by EdWeb was provocatively titled, “4 Lies the System Teaches School Leaders about Struggling Readers.”  The first “lie,” according to the presenter is that struggling readers have a lower cognitive capacity than typical readers.  Is that a lie?  Well, whether or not this is a lie depends on what you mean by cognitive capacity. 

The Role of Cognitive Remediation in Special Education

Current approaches to special education generally seek bypass the cognitive processes that are weak in order to minimize the impact of processing deficits. Remediation of cognitive processes needs to be a fourth pillar in our approach to support students in special education.

Mind the Cognitive Gap

The phrase “Mind the Gap” refers to the gap between the train door and the station platform, particularly on the London underground system.  It reminds passengers to be careful when

Helping Children Take Responsibility for Their Own Learning Needs

I knew it was important to get at the root of the issues and provide the supports that Charlie needs.  When we started, he and I didn’t have a way to talk about the struggles.  Kids don’t know why they struggle or why something is hard for them.  They just struggle.  Conversations about school work just seemed to make him more anxious. It was time for a different approach.

The Science of Performance in Sports: Training the Mind

For decades, every sport, every athletic organization, and every sports executive has looked for its next superstar to elevate their performance. The world gravitates to sports superstars. And having high

Brain Games and Brain Training are Different

In the last week, we came across another study that says that neuroscientists have debunked the claims that a brain game results in a brain gain.  No kidding! Research scientists seem to be in love with the idea of contradicting the market hype about the value of brain games.  And that’s a good thing.  There is far too much hype.  And too little understanding of the difference between a brain game and serious cognitive training (also called brain-training). Saying that a typical “brain game” can yield measurable cognitive benefit that translates into real-world improvements is like saying that exercising the biceps of your left arm will lead to overall physical fitness.

BrainWare Implementation and Impact Report – Big Shoulders Fund

This case study summarizes the experience of six schools that elected to implement BrainWare with students in middle elementary grades, with the support of the Big Shoulders Fund in Chicago, IL.  Big Shoulders Fund provides support to Catholic schools in the neediest areas of inner-city Chicago.  Student growth and outcomes were tracked over time using the ACT Aspire Interim assessments, with some significant growth for students who used the program most consistently with the recommended frequency and intensity.

Implementation of Computer-Based Cognitive Assessment and Cognitive Training with Elementary Students Lagging in Academic Performance

In a textbook implementation of Mindprint and BrainWare at Riverside Elementary in Evans, GA, the overwhelming majority of the students experienced substantial growth in their cognitive skills in multiple areas and all students saw growth in at least some areas.  Average growth across all ten of the Mindprint subtests was 21 percentile points. 

Impact of Computer-Based Cognitive Training on Elementary Students’ Reading Skills

Students at Wyhcocomagh Education Centre in Nova Scotia gained 4.5 reading levels on average and improved on academic fluency tests by one-half to 4 grade equivalents over 12 weeks following cognitive training with BrainWare SAFARI.

Am I Smarter than a Fifth Grader?

A reading coach and mentor describes her experience using BrainWare SAFARI with her students, more than doubling their growth in reading levels and dramatically improving their intellective capacity She explains that, in working through BrainWare, her students had not only pushed past their own problem-solving ability through trying, and trying again and not giving up, but they had also pushed past her own ability.