Home » Posts Tagged "Brain"

The Brain Connections Involved in Procrastination

Researchers have discovered that people who procrastinate tend to have larger amygdalae (the structure in the brain associated with fear) and weaker connections between the amygdala and the part of the brain that regulates the recognition of salience of fear and initiation.

How Neurons Multitask

Duke University researchers have shown that neurons seem to be capable of carrying more than one signal at a time.  They do this, apparently, in much the same way that telecommunications engineers developed rapid switching between pieces of two different messages.

BrainWare SAFARI and Other Summer Brain Builders

In this webinar, we will talk about best practices for using BrainWare SAFARI with your child and we will explore other activities that can help strengthen children’s cognitive skills so that the upcoming summer weeks are a time to build, rather than lose, learning capacity.

The Marshmallow Test Revisited

You may already be familiar with the marshmallow test.  If not, imagine a 4-year old in a room.  The researcher puts a marshmallow on the table in front of the

What Is Learning?

In this webinar, we dig underneath the surface of teaching and learning and explore the most important things teachers, parents and trainers of all kinds need to know about learning in the brain and how to create the most effective learning experiences.

Can You Read this Road Map?

Reading a road map is about more than knowing left from right, especially in the days when we didn’t all have GPS systems in our cars and on our phones. 

What Our Brains Think is Funny

April Fools’ Day reminds us to think about the lighter side of life and the age-old question: Why are some things funny?  Now the neuroscientists have gotten into the game

Brain Processes that Support Sharing

Why is sharing so hard for very young children?  Like many aspects of development, it has to do with our frontal lobes (prefrontal cortex, in neuroscience-speak) according to research.  The

Cognitive Skills and Math

Reading involves the simultaneous, coordinated use of multiple mental processes, including attention skills, working memory, visualization, and planning according to an article written by Betsy Hill and published by EdCircuit.

Automaticity – What It Takes and Why It Matters

Automaticity is a concept we talk about in cognitive training — getting skills practiced to the point where they don’t require conscious thought.  The concept also applies in other training

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