Home » Posts Tagged "Brain"

What Is Learning?

Webinar Scheduled:  What Is Learning May 1, 2018, 11:00 AM Central Time Students go to school to learn. Teachers take professional development courses to learn. Employees participate in training courses

Can You Read this Road Map?

Reading a road map is about more than knowing left from right, especially in the days when we didn’t all have GPS systems in our cars and on our phones. 

What Our Brains Think is Funny

April Fools’ Day reminds us to think about the lighter side of life and the age-old question: Why are some things funny?  Now the neuroscientists have gotten into the game

Brain Processes that Support Sharing

Why is sharing so hard for very young children?  Like many aspects of development, it has to do with our frontal lobes (prefrontal cortex, in neuroscience-speak) according to research.  The

Cognitive Skills and Math

Reading involves the simultaneous, coordinated use of multiple mental processes, including attention skills, working memory, visualization, and planning according to an article written by Betsy Hill and published by EdCircuit.

Automaticity – What It Takes and Why It Matters

Automaticity is a concept we talk about in cognitive training — getting skills practiced to the point where they don’t require conscious thought.  The concept also applies in other training

Sleep and Cognitive Functioning

We have been coming across so much research lately on the brain and sleep that it seems like a good time to remind ourselves what we know about sleep and

New Evidence for the Value of Mental Rehearsal

Skiiers at the Olympics mentally go through their run or a ski jump prior to competing, as do the figure skaters, and other athletes.  Perhaps they have even rehearsed listening

Pixels the Size of Neurons May Transform Brain Imaging

Technology has been reducing the size of pixels on a screen to the point where scientists believe they can focus on brain activity at the level of individual neurons.  That

Gesturing Reflects Language Development in Young Children

Gesturing by very young children is associated with language development.  Research shows that observing gestures can help predict language delays and may eventually be useful in diagnosing language development problems

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