Home » Archive by Category "Neuroscience Network News"

CIOReview Names BrainWare Learning Company to Top 20 Gamification List

BrainWare Learning Company is named one of the top 20 global gamification solutions providers by CIOReview, a leading online technology magazine, in the publication’s November issue. According to CIOReview, the

Why Teachers Should Study Neuroscience – Dr. Pat Wolfe Webinar

Join award-winning author and presenter, Dr. Pat Wolfe for a “mini-web” session on the application of brain research to instructional practice. If you're ever wondered would neuroscience could do for your teaching, you won't want to miss this!

Cognitive Skills: The Foundation for Learning

Cognitive Skills are the mental processes our brains use to take in, organize, understand and retrieve information. So much of what happens in our brains are processes we aren’t even aware of when they happen. But while they may happen non-consciously, they define our ability to learn.

Two Types of Brain Waves – Two Types of Memory

Neuroscience researchers at MIT have been able to distinguish between brain waves associated with explicit learning and implicit learning. The fact that different types of brain waves are involved underscores the importance of teachers understanding the difference between the two types of memory and the different strategies that will be effective in the two types of learning.

Check Your Financial Literacy

The FINRA Investor Education Foundation has been studying the financial knowledge of adults in the U.S. through a short 5-question quiz as part of its Financial Capability Study. Sadly, Americans do not fare very well. Happily, the questions could easily be turned into engaging classroom exercises for middle- and high-school age students

Bullying Causes Long-Term Physical Brain Changes

If you think that bullying is something kids will someday get over, think again.  Research shows that bullying results in physical brain changes and serious long-term cognitive and emotional deficits.

Human Brains Find Hidden Objects that Computers Can’t Find

Do you see the keys in this picture? That's because the human brain is really good at seeing partially obscured objects. New research conducted at the University of Washington in Seattle examined the interactions between the visual cortex and the prefrontal cortex when subjects tried to identify partially hidden objects.

Babies Learn the Value of Hard Work

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have found that watching adults struggle with a couple of tasks before succeeding led to babies trying harder on their own tasks.

Quick Cognitive Health Check for Adults

There is a new online test that will give you an idea how strong your mental functioning is, particularly attention and short-term memory. And it will let you know if you should consult a medical professional.

A Cognitive Lesson from a Backwards Bicycle

Riding a bike is something you’re never supposed to forget how to do once you’ve learned.  But what happens when you change how the bike works?  This video makes it

1/3123