Home » Archive by Category "How Brains Work"

Speaking in Sentences

Thursday, July 31, 2018, is National Speak in Complete Sentences Day.  Of course, it’s meant to remind us that to make sure our sentences have subjects and verbs and are

Facts and Myths about the Brain: Can You Tell Them Apart?

How much do you know about the brain?  Can you separate brain facts from brain fiction? Brain fiction, or neuromyths, can lead us to ineffective or even counterproductive strategies as

Wild Guesses May Not Be That Wild

If we don’t have facts to go on, we can still guess.  We call them wild guesses, but they’re based on something.  Sometimes, we call our guesses “educated,” meaning we

Who Is Smarter — Millennials or Baby Boomers?

Are millennials or baby boomers smarter? That is the question being researched by a middle school student who met with Betsy Hill, president of BrainWare Learning, via Nepris.

What Our Brains Think is Funny

April Fools’ Day reminds us to think about the lighter side of life and the age-old question: Why are some things funny?  Now the neuroscientists have gotten into the game

Brain Processes that Support Sharing

Why is sharing so hard for very young children?  Like many aspects of development, it has to do with our frontal lobes (prefrontal cortex, in neuroscience-speak) according to research.  The

Cognitive Skills and Math

Reading involves the simultaneous, coordinated use of multiple mental processes, including attention skills, working memory, visualization, and planning according to an article written by Betsy Hill and published by EdCircuit.

Automaticity – What It Takes and Why It Matters

Automaticity is a concept we talk about in cognitive training — getting skills practiced to the point where they don’t require conscious thought.  The concept also applies in other training

Sleep and Cognitive Functioning

We have been coming across so much research lately on the brain and sleep that it seems like a good time to remind ourselves what we know about sleep and

Bright Lights Before Bedtime Problematic for Preschoolers’ Sleep

Parents should dim the lights for preschoolers for the hour before bedtime, suggest scientists at the University of Colorado Boulder, who recently conducted research on the impact of pre-bedtime light

1/512345