Home » Archive by Category "How Brains Work"

Sleep and Cognitive Functioning

We have been coming across so much research lately on the brain and sleep that it seems like a good time to remind ourselves what we know about sleep and

Bright Lights Before Bedtime Problematic for Preschoolers’ Sleep

Parents should dim the lights for preschoolers for the hour before bedtime, suggest scientists at the University of Colorado Boulder, who recently conducted research on the impact of pre-bedtime light

New Evidence for the Value of Mental Rehearsal

Skiiers at the Olympics mentally go through their run or a ski jump prior to competing, as do the figure skaters, and other athletes.  Perhaps they have even rehearsed listening

Pixels the Size of Neurons May Transform Brain Imaging

Technology has been reducing the size of pixels on a screen to the point where scientists believe they can focus on brain activity at the level of individual neurons.  That

Friends Share Brain Patterns

Researchers have been exploring the ways our brains respond in social situations and have found that our brains activity predicts a number of things.  A recent study shows that the

The Fine Art of Complaining

Negativity rewires our brain to be more prone to negativity and practicing gratitude is more healthy. However, complaining has its place and there is an art to it.

Neuroscience-Based Learning Strategies for Teachers and Students

There’s a lot we can learn from neuroscience about the learning process and how to get learning to stick. Teachers need to understand some basics of neuroscience so that they can help students learn better.  Students also need to learn about their brains so that they will be able to utilize strategies to be more successful, whether it is school-related or not. 

Digital Assistants that Seem Too Human May Not Work Best

The more human digital assistants seem, the more we experience them as human and the more we may try to interact with them as if they were human.  Or the more we may avoid interacting with them ….

How Mirror Neurons Signal Empathy and Moral Decision-Making

Mirror neurons are a type of neuron that is equally active when we are performing an activity or watching someone else perform that activity.  They have been shown to have a role in imitation, in empathy, and most recently their activity has been shown to predict moral choices that involve others.

The Neuroscience of Stress and Learning

In this webinar, Dr. Lou Whitaker, President of Open Minds Enterprises, discusses the neuroscience of stress, the effect of stress on learning and development, and tools and strategies for helping our students and ourselves deal with stress, both acute and chronic.