Home » Archive by Category "How Brains Work"

Why We Root for the Underdog

In one study, people rooted for a fictional basketball team described as being expected to lose, rather than the team that was supposed to win, 88 percent of the time.  Scientists have put forward a number of different theories on why we have such a tendency to favor the less favored. 

Do Smartphones Make You Dumber?

Research is now showing that just having your phone on your desk, even though it is turned off, results in poorer performance on demanding cognitive tasks than if the cell phone is out of sight and in another room. 

Do Brains Blink?

The research says that our brains do, in fact, "blink," every time we shift our attention!  When we shift our attention from one object to another, the activity of the neurons in the visual cortex is temporarily disrupted.

Punctuation in Text Messages

Have you ever wondered whether to put a period at the end of your text message?  It may sound trivial, but it can make a difference in how your message is perceived. 

Research Suggests Visual Skills Are Different from IQ

Research at Vanderbilt University suggests that people differ significantly in their visual skills and showed that visual skills were not associated with IQ.

Gratitude is Good for the Brain

Expressing gratitude can help with depression, help us sleep better and make us feel more connected to those around us.  Perhaps surprisingly, the beneficial effects seem to last for months afterward.  

Cognitive Skills: The Foundation for Learning

Cognitive Skills are the mental processes our brains use to take in, organize, understand and retrieve information. So much of what happens in our brains are processes we aren’t even aware of when they happen. But while they may happen non-consciously, they define our ability to learn.

Human Brains Find Hidden Objects that Computers Can’t Find

Do you see the keys in this picture? That's because the human brain is really good at seeing partially obscured objects. New research conducted at the University of Washington in Seattle examined the interactions between the visual cortex and the prefrontal cortex when subjects tried to identify partially hidden objects.

Babies Learn the Value of Hard Work

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have found that watching adults struggle with a couple of tasks before succeeding led to babies trying harder on their own tasks.

High Moral Reasoning Linked to Brain’s Reward System

An international team of scientists has shown that high moral reasoning is associated with increased activity in a key part of the brain's reward system. In other words, our brain activity reflects how morally developed we are.

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