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Dynamic Demo Webinar Week

The second week of April is the time.  Our webinar platform is the place.  Six dynamic demos of our unbeatable Cognitive Literacy Solutions.  Hope to see you there!

Why Teachers and Students Need to Learn about Their Brains in the Digital Age

For good and bad, technology changes our brains. But then again, so does every experience we have. So what are our brains doing and becoming in the digital age?

Two Alphabets for the Same Language?

Scientists taught English speakers/readers a new alphabet where the “letters” looked like different types of houses.  The speakers/readers were able to learn the new alphabet and started to read at about a first-grade level following the two-week training protocol.  The fact that we can learn a second alphabet shouldn’t really be surprising. What may be surprising is why this is practical.

The Brain — Webinar for Broad Creek Middle School

Betsy Hill,  BrainWare Learning Company's president, met with middle-school students via Nepris, and discussed how we know what parts of the brain do, how the brain changes when we learn and the role of sleep in learning, as well as widely held neuromyths.

Reading is Not Natural — Part One

Humans as a species did not evolve to read.  We did evolve for language – that capacity is hard-wired.  But in order to read, we have to trick our brains into co-opting brain processes that do other things.

What You Eat Affects Your Brain

This excellent video answers these questions and helps us understand that the food we consume affect our brains, just as it affects our hearts and the rest of our bodies.

The Brain that Predicts the Future

Can your brain really predict the future?  Absolutely!  In fact, predicting the future is something our brains do constantly. It turns out that there are two different areas of the brain that helpp us anticipate when something will happen.

The Brain Connections Involved in Procrastination

Researchers have discovered that people who procrastinate tend to have larger amygdalae (the structure in the brain associated with fear) and weaker connections between the amygdala and the part of the brain that regulates the recognition of salience of fear and initiation.

Speaking in Sentences

Thursday, July 31, 2018, is National Speak in Complete Sentences Day.  Of course, it’s meant to remind us that to make sure our sentences have subjects and verbs and are

Facts and Myths about the Brain: Can You Tell Them Apart?

How much do you know about the brain?  Can you separate brain facts from brain fiction? Brain fiction, or neuromyths, can lead us to ineffective or even counterproductive strategies as

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