No testimonials found

Home » 2019 (Page 4)

Do Too Many or Too Few Students from Poverty Get a Special Ed Label?

Do you have evidence for or believe that students living in poverty (with cognitive impact) are identified as needing specialized instruction and supports – therefore special education services?  Or do you believe that these students are over-identified as needing special education services and do not require them and unnecessarily receive an educational label.

Readable English Accelerates Reading Gains for Middle School Reading Resource Students

Product Studied:          Readable English Subjects      37 students in the 7th and 8th grade, in reading resource classes, at Maple Crest STEM Middle School, Kokomo,

Will ESSA Fail to Close the Achievement Gaps?

Achievement gaps persist for economically disadvantaged students, English Language Learners and students with disabilities. Will ESSA fail to close them?

Is Your Child’s IEP Really Making a Difference?

Unfortunately, far too often, parents find that their child’s IEP is neither all that individualized nor helping their child make substantial gains. This blog examines three concerns often expressed about IEPs.

Cognitive Literacy Solutions Demos

Six dynamic demos of our remarkable Cognitive Literacy Solutions. Enjoy!

Why Teachers and Students Need to Learn about Their Brains in the Digital Age

For good and bad, technology changes our brains. But then again, so does every experience we have. So what are our brains doing and becoming in the digital age?

Engage Students in a Literacy Adventure

LiteracyPlanet brings together curriculum-aligned literacy education and the latest digital technology. Whether for early reading skills or advanced grammar, LiteracyPlanet provides students with a learning adventure to help them develop excellent English literacy skills. 

Two Alphabets for the Same Language?

Scientists taught English speakers/readers a new alphabet where the “letters” looked like different types of houses.  The speakers/readers were able to learn the new alphabet and started to read at about a first-grade level following the two-week training protocol.  The fact that we can learn a second alphabet shouldn’t really be surprising. What may be surprising is why this is practical.

What Do You Mean by “Cognitive Capacity?”

A webinar hosted by EdWeb was provocatively titled, “4 Lies the System Teaches School Leaders about Struggling Readers.”  The first “lie,” according to the presenter is that struggling readers have a lower cognitive capacity than typical readers.  Is that a lie?  Well, whether or not this is a lie depends on what you mean by cognitive capacity. 

You Don’t Have to Be Dyslexic to Have Trouble Learning to Read English

In this webinar, we will explore the contributions of cognitive skills in learning to read. Then we will address the “special challenges” of the English language and some promising approaches that can be implemented by classroom teachers.

4/512345